… or I assume so. Actually, I have no basis on which to judge this, as I don’t eat beef or, um, any animal products, but $3 a pound is bananas-cheap. Housing Works’ new concept, reminiscent of so many Goodwill warehouses (represent, Milwaukie scrapper’s bins!) of yore, opened today at 261 W. 36th St. in Midtown. Racked has an opening-day report; it’s open Thursday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is closed Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Suppose I’ll have to check it out this weekend … anyone find anything nonsucky there?

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In celebration, visit my new (tertiary) blog on Garner’s Modern American Usage. Gooooo Bryan Garner!

(Above: My new (old) cat Smokey (aka the Smokestack, Smokey Dokums, Smokey-wheres-the-bandit) ponders the wisdom of Bryan Garner.)

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Snag this snazzy T — from which I stole my post title — at One Horse Shy for a cool $22.

Lots of language stuff going on right now — and not only in relation to my unending quest to update a certain stylebook that shall remain nameless, but in the mainstream media, too! Huzzah.

When I’m not getting my kicks reading insta-classics like Lapsing Into a Comma (Bill Walsh) and Woe is I (Patricia T. O’Connor),  I’m trawling through a pile of newspapers and magazines. Generally, they’re a fertile field from which to harvest examples of the uses (and misuses) of modern language; occasionally, they cross the line into explicitly surfacing issues of punctuation, style, and usage — as the Times did today in a story about the inclusion of a semicolon in the MTA’s latest public service ads about throwing away newspapers. It’s quite mawkish, not to mention obnoxiously high-handed, but I’m always secretly pleased that someone somewhere is still pondering the importance of clarity, concision, and coherence in writing.

Elsewhere: Mike Clark of the Greensboro News-Record recently took on the colon; the Daily Freeman reported on schoolchildren protesting a restaurant’s use of capitalization; and the Sydney Morning Herald also ran a (somewhat confounding) glossary of new words that already seem a bit dated — I mean, tanorexia? How Rachel Zoe, circa 2006.

If reading isn’t your thing (which … umm … would be nonsensical, as this text-heavy post is all about word nerdery….but I digress …), you can fake it until you make it with buy grammarrelated T-shirts!)   

Maybe it’s a fluke — or perhaps all this language lovin’ is in anticipation of National Grammar Day on March 4.  The Web site devoted to the holiday has some great links, and its creators even offer a recipe for a Grammartini. See, we’re only selectively curmudgeonly!

Above, Obama logo as captured by CommandZed on Flickr. Below, an iron grate I saw on the Upper East Side. Coincidence? I think not. Barack the vote! (Bonus link, courtesy NYT: “Is Obama a Mac and Clinton a PC?”)