In honor of my discovery of Steal This Wiki (based on Abbie Hoffman’s Steal This Book), I present a bit of culture-jamming from the mean (har har) streets of Williamsburg, Brooklyn — the above picture is of homemade stickers with slogans such as “We are rapacious developers” pasted onto a real estate company’s plate-glass storefront etched with “plain-folks” platitudes so unfriendly bohemians begin to bond with the nouveau riche couples snapping up million-dollar condos in post-industrial playland.

Bonus: I love public art, even if (or particularly when!) it’s a bit rough around the edges, as evidenced by this street scene from N. 6th —

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Image via Mark This-or-That on Flickr (licensed under Creative Commons)

Intriguing event alert: The Sex Workers’ Art Show is this Saturday (8 p.m., the Zipper Factory, 336 W. 37th St., $15). Mere titillation? Well, here’s how the cabaret-style gathering is described:

“The show is an eye-popping evening of visual and performance art created by people in the sex industry to dispel the myth that they are anything short of artists, innovators, and geniuses! … It smashes traditional stereotypes and moves beyond ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ into a fuller articulation of the complicated ways sex workers experience their jobs and their lives. The Sex Workers’ Art Show entertains, arouses, and amazes, while offering scathing and insightful commentary on notions of class, race, gender, labor, and sexuality.”

Bonus links (because I did indeed major in gender studies):
International Prostitutes Collective
U.S. PROStitutes Collective
Indian Sex Workers Collective
“Reproductive Justice and Gender: Sex Work 2.0”
Network of Sex Work Projects
Deepthroated — a blog for sex workers

In preparation for my trip, I’ve been poking around the Interwebs for information about street culture in Guatemala. I love the idea of public art, sanctioned or unsanctioned, and it appears that there’s an active graffiti community in the country. Mi Mundo offers a vivid glimpse of this, as well as interesting commentary to contextualize the images. Wire Tap also has a story and interview on HIJOS (Hijos e Hijas por la Identidad y la Justicia contra el Olvido y el Silencio (Sons and Daughters for Identity and Justice against Oblivion and Silence), the group responsible for the graffiti.

(For kicks, a Flickr set of public art in India.)