Yup, New York’s guv was caught on a federal wiretap soliciting a prostitute. Prospect of me getting any work done this afternoon? About as good as Spitzer getting off scott-free. Everybody’s talking about it, and I don’t have much to add to the discussion, so, without further ado, books about prostitution for your scholarly edification:

An excerpt from the latter …

Passing now to the fourth of this vice we find prostitution in a most repulsive form, the women themselves diseased and dirty the houses redolent of bad rum.

Poor-quality booze! Say it isn’t so!

One of my latest guilty pleasures has been doing Google Book searches on my favorite topics. A search for “tea” yielded a full scan of Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea, a meditation upon the social meaning of the beverage (particularly in Japan, but larger meaning can certainly be extrapolated). Okakura writes:

Teaism is a cult founded on the adoration of the beautiful among the ordinary facts of everyday existence. It inculcates purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order. It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible thing we know as life. … [W]hen we consider how small after all the cup of human enjoyment is, how easily drained to the dregs in our quenchless thirst for infinity, we shall not blame ourselves for making so much of the tea-cup.

Okakura also offers insight on the foibles of globalization (applicable, still, 100 years after he penned this tome):

Unfortunately the Western attitude is unfavorable to the understanding of the East. The Christian missionary goes to impart, but not to receive. Your information is based on the meagre translations of our immense literature, if not the unreliable anecdotes of passing travellers.

(And, an addendum in the form of a cool link: the National Institute of Health has an interesting collection of info on America’s tea craze, which blossomed right around the time Okakura’s book came out.)

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Just happened upon an iiiiiinteresting new Web site that is experimenting with helping people get access to reprints of public domain books (those out of copyright that have been scanned, for example, and put on Google Books).

It’s not completely free — if you want a reprint, you purchase it through Lulu — but prices are reasonable, and where else are you going to find a copy of Early Woodcut Initials, freshly bound, for $16.99?